The History of The Piper Arrow II PA28R-200 & Piper Arrow III PA28R-201

By Jason Zilberbrand

February 4, 2022 Educational

Piper Arrow II PA28R-200 & Piper Arrow III PA28R-201

Piper Arrow II PA28R-200 & Piper Arrow III PA28R-201

Piper Aircraft

Before Piper Aircraft, the business was known as Taylor Brothers Aircraft Manufacturing Company, established in 1927. The company moved its operations under its new engineer William T. Piper in 1937 after the death of one of the Taylor brothers.

Piper Aircraft was called the "Henry Ford of Aviation" even through the Great Depression because Piper believed in a low-cost, simple-to-operate private aircraft. Its first twin-engine aircraft made its debut in 1954. The aviation company eventually made its home in Vero Beach, Florida, in 1957. Today, its headquarters remain in Florida.

Piper Aircraft is one of the "big three" in aviation, along with Cessna and Beechcraft, and Textron Aviation owns all three companies. Many of Piper's models are a favorite for young and learning pilots as they are simple to use, compact, and can withstand landing even on shorter runways.

The Piper Arrow model had several earlier models, including the Cherokee Cruiser, Cherokee (5 variations), the Cherokee Warrior (3 variations), the Archer (3 variations), Turbo Dakota, Dakota, and the Cherokee Pathfinder (2 variations). The Arrow series is part of the Cherokee line of aircraft.

  • Country of Origin: America

Piper Arrow II PA28R-200 & Piper Arrow III

The following are the statistics of both Arrow II and III models.

Piper Arrow II PA28R-200 Statistics

145 kts

Maximum Speed

907 nm

Maximum Range

4

Maximum Occupants

1969–1972

Range Of Years Manufactured

4,000

Total Aircraft Build

1,786

Current Operational Aircraft

1,459 lbs

Useful Load

$88,754–$91,916

Average Sale Value

Visit VREF Online

VREF Demand Rating


Piper Arrow III PA28R-201 Statistics

149 kts

Maximum Speed

907 nm

Maximum Range

4

Maximum Occupants

1977–1979

Range Of Years Manufactured

4,000

Total Aircraft Build

1,786

Current Operational Aircraft

1,637 lbs

Useful Load

$87,082–$291,146

Average Sale Value


Visit VREF Online

VREF Demand Rating AAA


Operational Resources

Operations Manual

Maintenance Document

Local Resources

Manufacturer

Insurance

Piper Arrow II PA28R-200 & Piper Arrow III PA28R-201 Details

Below includes descriptions for both the Piper Arrow II and Piper Arrow III models.

Arrow II

Interior

The interior of Arrow II closely resembles the Cherokee with the same or similar gauges, systems, handling, and procedures. However, it was a bigger and better version at the time, featuring added comforts like an extended fuselage for more passenger legroom, wider cabin windows, and doors.

Exterior

An updated paint scheme gave the Arrow II a brand new look. It had a few other modifications like a newly designed upswept rudder along with a 26-inch wingspan increase to help make the rate of climb and takeoff run smoother. Another notable difference from earlier models is that the Arrow II now offered retractable landing gear instead of fixed gear.

Arrow III

Interior

The inside of the Arrow III saw improvements in its cabin heat control features and several visual animations to improve components like the passenger door, baggage door, cockpit storm window, and sun visors.

Additionally, this model was designed to offer more protection and comfort with its newly designed seats. They have a crash-worthy S-tube design meant to collapse gradually and absorb energy during an impact.

Exterior

The most notable difference between Arrow III and II is its tapered wing design. The surprising design was released in 1977 along with the Piper Arrow III, replacing the Arrow's previous well-known Hershey Bar design. The updated wing style was taken from the Cherokee 140 and provided more range than past models.

Avionics

The Piper Arrow II PA28R-200 and Piper Arrow III PA28R-201 may or may not contain the following avionics:

Piper Arrow II

  • Avionics Master Switch

  • King KMA20 Audio Panel

  • King KX170B Nav/Com (2)

  • Dual VOR Heads With Glideslope

  • King KN74 RNAV

  • King KR85 ADF With Movable Card Indicator

  • Garmin 327 Transponder

  • uAvionix SkyBeacon ADS-B "Out"

  • Piper AutoControl III Autopilot

  • Pilot Yoke Mounted Trim And Push to Talk

  • AUX Radio Master Switch

  • ELT

  • Magnetic Compass

  • Pilot Seat Headset Jacks

  • Handheld Mic

Piper Arrow III

  • Garmin GNSS 650 WAAS

  • Dual Garmin G5 (Attitude And HSI)

  • TruTrak Autopilot With Altitude Preselect And GPS Steering

Specifications

Piper Arrow II

  • Configuration: Single Engine, Piston, Retractable Gear

  • Max Seats: 4

  • Max Take-Off Weight (200): 2,650 lbs.

  • Cruise: 140 kts

  • Range: 640 nm

  • Take Off Run: 1,025 ft.

  • Landing Roll: 780 ft.

  • Wing Span: 32 ft.

  • Length: 24 ft. 8 in.

  • Height: 8 ft.

  • Take Off (50 ft.): 1,800 ft.

Piper Arrow III

  • Configuration: Single Engine, Piston, Retractable Gear

  • Max Seats: 4

  • Max Take-Off Weight (200): 2,650 lbs.

  • Cruise: 140 kts

  • Range : 640 nm

  • Take Off Run: 1,025 ft.

  • Landing Roll: 780 ft.

  • Wing Span: 32 ft.

  • Length: 24 ft. 8 in.

  • Height: 8 ft.

  • Take Off (50ft): 1,800 ft.

Piper PA-28 Models

PA-28-140 Cherokee Cruiser

This 1964-certified two-seater has a fixed landing gear landplane and Lycoming O-320-E2A or O-320-E3D engine. This model debuted with a gross weight of 1,950 lbs. In 1965, the Cruiser was approved for increasing seating from two to four seats and a gross weight change to 2,150 lbs.

PA-28-150 Cherokee

This four-seater fixed landing gear landplane received its certification in 1961. It's equipped with a Lycoming O-320-A2B or O-320-E2A engine. This model kept the same gross weight as its predecessor at 2,150 lbs.

PA-28-151 Cherokee Warrior

The introduction of the Warrior featured four seats and fixed landing gear. This variation is equipped with a Lycoming O-320-E3D engine. Its gross weight increased from 2,150 lbs. to 2,325 lbs. The Warrior was first certified in 1973. One noticeable change from the PA-28-150 includes a tapered wing.

PA-28-160 Cherokee

The 160 Cherokee has four seats, fixed landing gear, and a Lycoming O-320-B2B or O-320-D2A engine. With this model, its gross weight decreased from 2,325 to 2,200 lbs. This model was first certified in 1960.

PA-28-161 Warrior II

After several years of producing the 160 Cherokee, Piper introduced a new version, certified in 1982. This four-seater, fixed landing gear landplane has a Lycoming O-320-D3G or O-320-D2A engine. Furthermore, its gross weight bumped back up to 2,325 lbs. We see another tapered wing with this model, different from its 160 version, and this aircraft has a gross weight of 2,440 lbs.

PA-28-161 Warrior III

The last of the Warrior variations received its certification in 1994. The Warrior III is a four-seater, fixed landing gear landplane with a Lycoming O-320-D3G engine. Its gross weight remains the same as the Warrior II at 2,440 lbs.

PA-28-180 Cherokee

The Cherokee returns with an engine change with the Lycoming O-360-A3A or O-360-A4A engine. It has a gross weight of 2,400 lbs. and received its certification in 1962.

PA-28-180 Archer

The first Archer model, certified in 1972, is a four-seater, fixed landing gear landplane equipped with a Lycoming O-360-A4A or O-360-A4M engine. The Archer also received an increase in gross weight from 2,400 lbs. Additional changes from the PA-28-180 Cherokee include increased wingspan, five-inch fuselage extension, larger horizontal tail, and more.

PA-28-181 Archer II

The second Archer received its certification in 1975. This four-seater aircraft is equipped with a Lycoming O-360-A4M or O-360-A4A engine. It has a gross weight of 2,550 lbs. and has tapered wings, unlike the original Archer model.

PA-28-181 Archer III

The final Archer III received its certification in 1994. The four-seater, fixed landing gear landplane is equipped with a Lycoming O-360-A4M engine and has a gross weight of 2,550 lbs.

PA-28-201T Turbo Dakota

The turbocharged Turbo Dakota received its certification in 1978 and is equipped with a turbocharged Continental TSIO-360-FB engine of 200 horsepower. The Archer III also features a gross weight of 2,900 lbs.

PA-28-235 Cherokee Pathfinder

First certified in 1963, the Cherokee Pathfinder has a Lycoming O-540-B2B5, O-540-B1B5, or O-540-B4B5 engine and a gross weight of 2,900 lbs.

PA-28-235 Cherokee Pathfinder

The next 1963-certified Cherokee Pathfinder has a Lycoming O-540-B4B5 engine, gross weight of 3,000 lbs., and features a five-inch fuselage extension, wing span increase, larger horizontal tail, and more.

PA-28-236 Dakota

This Dakota variation received its certification in 1978. The four-seater, fixed landing gear landplane has a Lycoming O-540-J3A5D engine and a gross weight of 3,000 lbs. One significant difference from the previous Cherokee Pathfinder includes a tapered wing.

PA-28S-160 Cherokee

This Cherokee model received its certification in 1963. This fixed landing gear aircraft has a Lycoming O-320-D2A engine and a gross weight of 2,140 lbs.

PA-28S-180 Cherokee

A year after the PA-28S-160, Piper debuted the PA-28S-180 Cherokee, which received its certification in 1963. It has a Lycoming O-360-A3A or O-360-A4A engine and a gross weight of 2,222 lbs.

PA-28R-180 Arrow

The first of the Arrow family, the PA-28R-180 Arrow, received its certification in 1967. When Piper introduced the Arrow, the Florida-based company removed the Cherokee 150 and 160 from further production. This Arrow has retractable landing gear and is equipped with a Lycoming IO-360-B1E engine. It also has a gross weight of 2,500 lbs.

PA-28R-200 Arrow

The first of the Arrow family, the PA-28R-200, has a Lycoming IO-360-C1C engine, gross weight of 2,600 lbs., and was first certified in 1969.

PA-28R-200 Arrow II

The 1971-certified Arrow II has a Lycoming IO-360-C1C or C1C6 engine and a gross weight of 2,650 lbs. This model differs from the 1969-certified PA-28R-200 with a five-inch fuselage extension, larger horizontal tail, wing span increase, and smaller changes.

PA-28R-201 Arrow III

The Arrow III has one engine option in the Lycoming IO-360-C1C6 with 200 horsepower. The Arrow III also has a semi-tapered wing. It has a gross weight of 2,750 lbs. and was first certified in 1976.

PA-28R-201T Turbo Arrow III

The Turbo Arrow III is a four-seater, retractable landing gear landplane with a turbocharged Continental TSIO-360-F or TSIO-360-FB engine. Its gross weight is 2,900 lbs. Arrow III received its certification in November 1976.

PA-28RT-201 Arrow IV

The Arrow IV was first certified in 1978. It has a Lycoming IO-360-C1C6 engine, gross weight of 2,750 lbs., and a T-tail design.

PA-28RT-201T Turbo Arrow IV

The 1978-certified Turbo Arrow IV has a turbocharged Continental TSIO-360-FB engine, gross weight of 2,900 lbs., and T-tail design.

PA-28-161 Cadet

The first Cadet replaced the PA-38 Tomahawk trainer in the late 1980s. It has a Lycoming O-320-D2A or O-320-D3G engine and a gross weight of 2,325 lbs.

Archer DX

This turbocharged Archer was first introduced at AERO Friedrichshafen in April of 2014. It has a Continental CD-155 diesel engine and is designed to make the compression-ignition engine simpler to operate. This upgrade protects it from running into starting difficulties. Other features include carburetor icing or propeller and mixture controls, and the liquid cooling doesn't suffer shock cooling in a fast descent. Full power for this turbocharged Archer can reach up to over 10,000 ft. and climbs 700 to 500 ft./min (3.6 to 2.5 m/s) at 86 kts (159 km/h). The Archer DX has a 4.2 to 6.3 U.S. gallons cruise fuel flow. The engine on this variation must be replaced every 2,100 hours.

Pilot 100 & Pilot i100

Both Pilot versions were introduced in 2019. Meant to be low-cost VFR and IFR trainers for the flight training market, both designs offer fixed landing gear and Continental Prime IO-370-D3A engine. It also has Garmin G3X Touch Certified avionics. The IFR version includes GFC500 autopilot and features the 2-side-window fuselage with the later tapered wing. It does not include a baggage door, air conditioning, or right-hand panel instruments. This model does have all-white paint with decals, two-place seating standard on 100, rear third seat with push-to-talk, and standard Bluetooth functions. These newer versions received their type certification in the U.S. in December of 2020 and in Europe of 2021.

Top Piper Arrow Questions

How Much Does A Piper Arrow Cost?

To get an accurate cost of the Piper Arrow, you would need to determine which version you're interested in. The average sale value for an Arrow II is around $88,754 to $91,916. The Arrow III can be far more expensive as it has an average sale range of anywhere between $87,082 and $291,146. Because the pricing range is so wide, it's essential to get an appraisal before agreeing to a sale. Underneath a shiny coat of paint could include corrosion, deterioration, and other depreciating aspects.

How Fast Is A Piper Arrow?

Cruise speeds for the Piper Arrow range from 130 to 143 knots. However, this range increases to 170 knots for the turbocharged version of this aircraft.

Is It Easy To Fly A Piper Arrow?

Pilots enjoy the Arrow as a nice flying plane with reasonable cruise control. Pilots also like that it's a more affordable aircraft with increased adequate space, specifically in the Arrow II model. Some pilots say that takeoff and climb performance has been an underwhelming experience. Those who didn't purchase a Piper Arrow ended up turning to Mooney for a similar single-engine aircraft.

What Engine Does A Piper Arrow Have?

The latest model from the PA28 series has a Lycoming 200 horsepower TBO 2000 IO-360-C1C engine.

All other Arrow engines include:

  • Lycoming IO-360-B1E (Original Arrow)

  • Lycoming IO-360-C1C (PA-28R-200 Arrow)

  • Lycoming IO-360-C1C or C1C6 (Arrow II)

  • Lycoming IO-360-C1C6 (Arrow III)

  • Turbocharged Continental TSIO-360-F or TSIO-360-FB (Turbo Arrow III)

  • Lycoming IO-360-C1C6 (Arrow IV)

  • Turbocharged Continental TSIO-360-FB (Turbo Arrow IV)

Why Is Piper Associated With Hershey's Bars?

Piper is known for its Hershey-bar wing design because it resembles the shape of the classic confection. This design decision was well talked about at the time as it gained popularity. However, the conversation around its signature style included doubts about its landing performance.

By 1974, Piper switched to a semi-tapered wing on the Warrior and later applied this wing style to other Cherokee variations, including the Arrow II. However, Arrow III has a semi-tapered wing and a longer stabilator. You can easily spot the difference between the two models, although their names are similar.

Related VREF Resources

ALERT: Proposed AD for all Piper PA-28 Series aircraft and the PA-32 (AD 2018-CE-049-AD)

Piper Cherokee PA-28 180

Looking For More Information On All Piper Arrow Models?

After almost 30 years in business, we're proud to offer accurate and unbiased information on hundreds of aircraft. Join VREF Online and get consistently updated data at the click of a button.

[Sign Up]