Piper Archer II & III PA28 181

By Jason Zilberbrand

May 31, 2022 Educational

Piper Archer II & III PA28 181

Piper Aircraft

Piper Aircraft was established by two brothers, Clarence and Gordon Taylor, in 1927. In what was then known as Taylor Aircraft Manufacturing Company, the Taylor brothers sought to design and manufacture aircraft. But not everything went as planned as Gordon Taylor was in a fatal accident in 1928 demonstrating one of their prototype aircraft.

After speaking to a wealthy businessman named William Piper, he convinced the remaining living brother to move to Pennsylvania and continue running the business. Taylor was distraught about his brother’s death but decided to take Piper up on his suggestion and moved. Piper was an early investor in the aircraft company, and he and Clarence worked together successfully selling a Taylor brother’s design – Piper’s Cub. It still has a reputation for being one of its best-selling aircraft. Pilots loved it because it was fairly affordable and easy to fly.

The aircraft manufacturer ran into trouble once the Great Depression hit in 1929. However, Piper was able to keep the company afloat. Over time, Clarence lost interest in the business and sold his portion of the company to Piper in 1936.

World War II, in particular, created sudden success for Piper Aircraft. There was a sudden demand for an affordable and easy-to-train on aircraft for military personnel. This made the Cub the go-to training aircraft for 80% of WWII pilots. As these pilots returned to civilian life, they became Piper’s newest group of aircraft enthusiasts.

Piper continued to design and create aircraft for many years to come including a few all-time favorites like the Apache, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Comanche, and others. Piper Aircraft continues to be hugely popular with pilots of all levels of experience, competing with big names like Cessna and Beechcraft.

  • Country of Origin: America

Piper Archer II PA28 181 (1994) Statistics

125 kts

Maximum Speed

520 nm

Maximum Range

4

Maximum Occupants

1976-1994

Range Of Years Manufactured

3,700

Total Aircraft Build

Unknown

Current Operational Aircraft

1,134 lbs

Useful Load

$174,189

Average Sale Value

16

Average Days On Market For Sale

Buyer

VREF Demand Rating

Piper Archer III PA28 181 (2010) Statistics

128 kts

Maximum Speed

443 nm

Maximum Range

5

Maximum Occupants

1995-2010

Range Of Years Manufactured

3,700

Total Aircraft Build

Unknown

Current Operational Aircraft

875 lbs

Useful Load

$252,195

Average Sale Value


16

Average Days On Market For Sale

Buyer

VREF Demand Rating


Operational Resources

Operations Manual

Maintenance Document

Local Resources

Manufacturer

Insurance

Piper Archer II & III PA28 181 Details

Below include descriptions for the 1980 Piper Archer II and 2010 Piper Archer III.

Interior

The Archer II has removable back seats designed for comfortable flying. Seats are made of UltraLeather and are available in many finishes. As was popular in the 70s, these standard models came with carpeting and an UltraSuede trim.

The Archer III offers an upgraded leather interior, carpeting, and accent trim. Air conditioning and autopilot came standard and were advertised as a family plane complete with comfortable interior seating.

Exterior

The exterior of Archer II is an all-metal frame with an aluminum alloy construction. However, its wingtips, cowling, and tail surfaces are made of fiberglass. The wings are semi-tapered, and it has a tricycle structure with a 2-blade propeller.

Similar to Archer II, Archer III is also constructed of aluminum alloy. It also has fiberglass components, including its wingtips, cowling, and tail surfaces. Aerobatics are not approved for this aircraft as its structure is not made for them. Its single-dual muffler system is stainless steel, and its fixed-stitch propeller is made from one single piece of alloy. It also has a three-gear landing system.

Avionics

Piper Archer II

  • Fully IFR Certified

  • Garmin 530-W GPS (Approach Certified)

  • King KX155 Nav/Com Radio

  • Autopilot

Piper Archer III

  • 02 Displays PFD/MFD Garmin G500 6.5”

  • VHF 1: GPS/Nav/Loc/GS/Comm Garmin GNS-430

  • VHF 2: GPS/Nav/Loc/GS/Comm Garmin GNS-430

  • Audio Panel Garmin GMA-340 w/ Marker Beacon

  • Transponder Garmin GTX-327

  • Autopilot STEC-55 X 2 axis

  • Stand-By Instruments

  • GDL 69A,

  • Stormscope

  • Synthetic Vision

  • Electric Trim

Specifications

Piper Archer II

  • Configuration: Single Engine, Piston, Fixed Gear

  • Max Seats: 4

  • Max Take-Off Weight: 2,550 lbs.

  • Cruise: 129 kts

  • Range: 520 nm

  • Take Off Run: 870 ft.

  • Landing Roll: 935 ft.

  • Wing Span: 35 ft.

  • Length: 23 ft. 10 in.

  • Height: 7 ft. 4 in.

  • Take Off (50 ft.): 1,625 ft.


Piper Archer III

  • Length: 24 ft.

  • Height: 7 ft. 4 in.

  • Wingspan: 25 ft. 6 in.

  • Empty Weight: 1,683 lbs.

  • Maximum Gross Weight: 2,550 lbs.

  • Useful Load: 875 lbs.

  • Max Take-Off Weight: 2550 lbs.

  • Fuel Capacity: 50 gal

  • Baggage Capacity: 26 cu ft.

  • Takeoff Distance, Ground Roll: 1,135 ft.

  • Takeoff Distance Over 50 ft. Obstacle: 1,610 ft.

  • Maximum Demonstrated Crosswind Component: 17 kts

  • Rate Of Climb, Sea Level: 667 fpm

  • Maximum Level Speed, Sea Level: 129 kts

  • Service Ceiling: 13236 ft.

  • Max Cruise Speed: 128 kts

  • Endurance 65%: 4.5 hr

Piper Archer Models

The following are variations of the Piper Archer, ranging from Piper’s Cherokee model to Pilot 100 and Pilot 100i models.

PA-28-140 Cherokee Cruiser

This aircraft was first certified on February 14, 1964, and it has a gross weight of 2,150 lbs. Powered by Lycoming O-320-E2A or O-320-E3D engines, this two-seater, fixed landing gear landplane has a horsepower of 150. It has a gross weight of 1,950 lbs.

PA-28-150 Cherokee

This Cherokee has a gross weight of 2,150 lbs. and was first certified on June 2, 1961. It’s a four-seater, fixed landing gear landplane powered by a Lycoming O-320-A2B or O-320-E2A engine with 150 horsepower.

PA-28-151 Cherokee Warrior

Gross weight came to 2,325 lbs. and was first certified on August 9, 1973. This aircraft features a tapered wing change from the PA-28-150. This variation is where the Warrior name is first introduced. This fixed-gear aircraft seats four and is powered by a Lycoming O-320-E3D engine with 150 horsepower.

PA-28-160 Cherokee

With a gross weight of 2,200 lbs., this Cherokee was first certified on October 31, 1960. This four-place, fixed landing gear aircraft is equipped with either a Lycoming O-320-B2B or O-320-D2A engine of 160 horsepower.

PA-28-161 Warrior II

This aircraft seats four and is powered by either a Lycoming O-320-D3G or O-320-D2A engine of 160 horsepower. On November 2, 1976, it had a gross weight set at 2,325 lbs. during its initial certification. It increased slightly by the time it received its second certification to 2,440 lbs. Changes from its predecessor include a tapered wing.

PA-28-161 Warrior III

This Warrior variation received its first certification on July 1, 1994. It is powered by a Lycoming O-320-D3G engine of 160 horsepower with a gross weight of 2,440 lbs.

PA-28-180 Cherokee

This aircraft has a gross weight of 2,400 lbs. and received its first certification on August 3, 1962. It seats four, is a fixed landing gear landplane, and is equipped with either a Lycoming O-360-A3A or O-360-A4A engine of 180 horsepower.

PA-28-180 Archer

The first Archer was certified on May 22, 1972. The PA-28-180 Cherokee changes feature a five-inch fuselage extension, wing span increase, larger horizontal tail, gross weight increase, and other minor changes. This PA version from Piper has a Lycoming O-360-A4A or O-360-A4M engine of 180 horsepower and a gross weight of 2,450 lbs.

PA-28-181 Archer II

The second Archer received its first certification on July 8, 1975. It features a refreshed tapered wing. Powered by a Lycoming O-360-A4M or O-360-A4A engine of 180 horsepower, this aircraft has a gross weight of 2,550 lbs.

PA-28-181 Archer III

The third and final Archer III received its certification on August 30, 1994. It is a four-seater, fixed landing gear landplane powered by a Lycoming O-360-A4M engine of 180 horsepower with a gross weight of 2,550 lbs.

PA-28-201T Turbo Dakota

Piper’s turbocharged Dakota has a gross weight of 2,900 lbs. and received its first certification on December 14, 1978. It’s equipped with a Continental TSIO-360-FB engine of 200 horsepower.

PA-28-235 Cherokee Pathfinder

The Pathfinder has a gross weight of 2,900 lbs. and received its first certification on July 15, 1963. It is powered by a Lycoming O-540-B2B5, O-540-B1B5, or O-540-B4B5 engine of 235 horsepower.

PA-28-235 Cherokee Pathfinder

Piper’s updated Pathfinder was first certified on June 9, 1972. It features a five-inch fuselage extension, wing span increase, larger horizontal tail, and gross weight increase. It has a fixed landing gear landplane and is equipped with a Lycoming O-540-B4B5 engine of 235 horsepower at a gross weight of 3,000 lbs.

PA-28-236 Dakota

The Dakota was first certified on June 1, 1978, with a refreshed tapered wing. It has a Lycoming O-540-J3A5D engine of 235 horsepower and a gross weight of 3,000 lbs.

PA-28S-160 Cherokee

First certified on February 25, 1963, this Cherokee is a four-seater, fixed landing gear seaplane equipped with a Lycoming O-320-D2A engine of 160 horsepower. It has a gross weight of 2,140 lbs.

PA-28S-180 Cherokee

This Cherokee seaplane variation is powered by a Lycoming O-360-A3A or O-360-A4A engine of 180 horsepower and has a gross weight of 2,222 lbs. It received its first certification on May 10, 1963.

PA-28R-180 Arrow

Entering the Arrow series of the line, this four-place, retractable landing gear landplane comes with a Lycoming IO-360-B1E engine of 180 horsepower and a gross weight of 2,500 lbs. It was first certified on June 8, 1967.

PA-28R-200 Arrow

Just two years after the initial Arrow, this version received its certification on January 16, 1969. It’s a four-place, retractable landing gear landplane with a Lycoming IO-360-C1C engine of 200 horsepower and a gross weight of 2,600 lbs.

PA-28R-200 Arrow II

Changes from the 1969 Arrow include a five-inch fuselage extension, wing span increase, and larger horizontal tail. Arrow II received its certification on December 2, 1971. It’s a four-seat, retractable landing gear landplane with a Lycoming IO-360-C1C or C1C6 engine of 200 horsepower. Its gross weight increased slightly to 2,650 lbs.

PA-28R-201 Arrow III

This aircraft was first certified on November 2, 1976. The third Arrow is also a four-place, retractable landing gear landplane with a different Lycoming IO-360-C1C6 engine of 200 horsepower and has a gross weight of 2,750 lbs.

PA-28R-201T Turbo Arrow III

The turbo variation of the Arrow series increased its gross weight to 2,900 lbs. It received its certification on November 2, 1976, and its non-turbo version. It seats four, is a retractable landing gear landplane, and comes equipped with either a turbocharged Continental TSIO-360-F or TSIO-360-FB engine of 200 horsepower.

PA-28RT-201 Arrow IV

This four-seater Arrow was first certified on November 13, 1978, with a T-tail design. It has a retractable landing gear with a Lycoming IO-360-C1C6 engine of 200 horsepower and a gross weight of 2,750 lbs.

PA-28RT-201T Turbo Arrow IV

The Arrow IV has retractable landing gear, a T-tail, a gross weight of 2,900 lbs., and was first certified on November 13, 1978. It is powered by a Continental TSIO-360-FB engine of 200 horsepower and seats four.

PA-28-161 Cadet

The only existing Cadet is a two-place, fixed landing gear landplane with either a Lycoming O-320-D2A or -D3G engine of 160 horsepower. The Cadet replaced the PA-38 Tomahawk trainer in the late 1980s. However, this aircraft features the older Cherokee’s 2-side window fuselage with the later tapered wing. Its gross weight decreased from its predecessor to 2,325 lbs.

Archer DX

The Archer DX was introduced at AERO Friedrichshafen in April of 2014. Its turbocharged version balances at full power up to over 10,000 ft. and climbs at 700 to 500 ft./min. at 86 knots. Cruise fuel flow is 4.2 to 6.3 US gal at 50 to 75% power and a 100 to 117 knots IAS. You must replace the engine every 2,100 hours.

The Archer DX features a compression-ignition engine that is simpler to operate, avoiding starting difficulties, carburetor icing or propeller and mixture controls, and the liquid cooling does not suffer shock cooling in a rapid descent. This variation reverts to four seats with fixed landing gear and a turbocharged Continental CD-155 diesel engine with 155 horsepower.

Pilot 100 and Pilot 100i

The Pilot 100 and Pilot 100i were to be seen as low-cost VFR and IFR trainers, respectively, for the flight training market in 2019. The VFR features a fixed landing gear and 180 horsepower Continental Prime IO-370-D3A engine. Avionics include a Garmin G3X with Touch Certification.

The IFR variation contains a GFC500 autopilot system, 2-side-window fuselage with the later tapered wing, no baggage door, no air conditioning, and no instruments on the right-hand panel. The 100 offers a two-place seating standard function, rear third seat with push-to-talk and Bluetooth functions standard on i100 and optional on the 100. These new versions were type certified in December 2020 in the United States and in August 2021 in Europe.

Top Piper Archer Questions

The following are answers to FAQs about the Piper Archer.

How Are Betty Miller & Piper Aircraft Linked?

Flying in a twin-engine Piper PA-23-160 Apache H from the United States, 37-year-old flight instructor Betty Miller delivered the aircraft to its owner in Australia in May of 1963. What made her journey unique was that she became the first woman to complete a solo Trans-Pacific flight and was the first pilot to make this flight without a navigator.

At the time, the media referred to her as the “flying housewife” because of her clean-cut, young appearance. However, Betty Miller was much more than a “flying housewife” as the media made her seem.

When she made that historic flight in 1963, she was already a commercial pilot, flight instructor, and owner and operator of a flight school and charter company located at Santa Monica Airport off the coast of Southern California with more than 6,500 hours of flight time. She was also an esteemed staff member at the Civil Aeronautics Administration and a member of the Ninety-Nines, Whirly-Girls, and FAA Women’s Advisory Committee. Betty Miller passed on February 21, 2018, at the age of 91.

How Much Does A New Piper Archer Cost?

Piper’s Archer LX has a base price of $449,803. However, this variation offers several custom packages and optional equipment, which will significantly alter its total cost.

What Is The Difference Between The Archer & Warrior?

The Warrior is a lighter aircraft that burns less fuel as a 160-horsepower Lycoming O-320 engine powers it. However, the Archer has an improved climb rate as it has an extra 20 horsepower. Additionally, the Archer is about five knots faster than the Warrior because of its added power. When choosing between the two, your decision should come down to what you need in an aircraft, your budget, and which you prefer to fly or train in.

Related VREF Resources

The History of The Piper Arrow II PA28R-200 & Piper Arrow III PA28R-201

Piper Cherokee PA-28 180

Explore Real-Time Piper Archer Data

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